Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Rancher Matthew

14 comments:

Mom said...

What a happy looking little boy!

Auntie said...

About that bucket calf--how old does he have to be, and what skill levels must he have?

Angela said...

I agree with your mom and I will add that he is awefully cute and adorable!

The author said...

You are asking the wrong person calf questions. We'd have to get Dad in on it because I wasn't allowed to have livestock for 4-H. Since he didn't run livestock when I was little, I have no knowledge, no training. (I can't even start or drive a tractor! But he's promised to teach me! Finally.) I believe maybe he should wait till around kindergarten though. One of our kindergarten girls, from a notorious cattle operating family, was complaining last spring that she had to brush her bucket calf every night and it had the worst hair ever. So yes, at least 3 more years. Dad, anyone?

Mom said...

On the cover of Grass and Grain this week there is a feature of a little boy who is only three and has a bucket calf. I've not read about it yet. Your dad thinks around six is a better age because the calves are stronger than little boys and can be a challenge to get fed twice a day. Sometimes they get sick and die which would be hard for a child. For 4-H purposes the child needs to be old enough to join the Cloverbuds which is age six, I think. Maybe five. Also, they are pretty expensive to buy right now.
Angela, thanks for mentioning that part about 'cute and adorable,' which I agree with but don't feel that I should mention since I'm more than a little prejudiced!!!

Mom said...

Ooops! Correction! The little boy was a three year 4-H member, not a three year old child! Sorry, I'll try to have my facts straight next time. Is it too late to sign myself as Anonymous???

nasuzyq said...

Duh (from CA)? What's a bucket calf? I think that Matthew is adorable with his hat like his Grandpa's! And I sent the tractor pic to my kids so they can see history in motion.

Beth said...

A bucket calf is one that is raised by hand rather than being left on the mother cow. In the old days you had to use a bucket of milk and guide the calf's mouth down to the milk by letting it suck your fingers and gently pull them down. It was a very messy process until the calf learned to drink from the bucket. Now they use special bottles and formula but the previous term stuck. I've never heard anyone call it a bottle calf.

Auntie said...

So the idea is that a youngster gets hands-on experience with very young lifestock, while learning to assume respnsibility for care and feeding? May I please have 2 bucket pigs?

Angela said...

Beth- I can't really say that I'm NOT prejudiced regarding how cute adn adorable he is. Like I tell everyone, my favorite child is the one that is in my person at that moment in time.

Thanks for the info on bucket calf- I was too busy to ask about it.

The author said...

Wow, even I learned some stuff I didn't know. Thanks for asking Susan!

The author said...

Oh, and what sort of bucket pigs do you want Auntie?

Auntie said...

A Hampshire and a pink one.

Anonymous said...

Have you noticed how busy your comment board becomes when the topic is Matthew and ranching or farming?